Summer 2011

An independent series of actions, taken by past and present generations of Public Movement members. An undeclared action taken without a leader, in various streets, squares and intersections in Tel Aviv.

Banks Guard - a series of summons by Public Movement’s members at certain hours, at the entrance of several banks along Rothchild Blvd. (the tents Blvd.)
Dancing in the streets - bursting into intersection, blocking the traffic with Horah dancing (Habima Intersection, Alenbi-Ben Zion Blvd. intersection, Alenbi-Rothchild Blvd. intersection). The same was done with Debkah dancing while Abu Mazen (the prime minister of the Palestinian Authority) first spoke at the UN. The dancing took place at Habimba intersection, Rothchild Blvd.- Hahashmonaim intersection and Alenbi-Rothchild Blvd. intersection.


Artists’ Protest- passing the physical knowledge of Public Movement to the hands of the Artists’ union and creating a choreography to their protest. Tel Aviv Museum of Art.

Public Movement members: Hagar Ophir, Luciana Kaplun, Yossi Tal Taib, Ma'ayan Choresh, Gali Libraider, Adili Lieberman, Saar Szekely,
Debkah: Jaad Kaadan
Artists' Protest: Dana Yahalomi, Hagar Ophir, Luciana Kaplun
Public Movement director: Dana Yahalomi

Special thanks to Eyal Vexler

  • Dafna Talmon, Artist protest, Helena Rubinstain Tel Aviv, Summer 2011.
  • Dafna Talmon, Artist protest, Helena Rubinstain Tel Aviv, Summer 2011.
  • Dafna Talmon, Artist protest, Helena Rubinstain Tel Aviv, Summer 2011.
  • Oz Mualm, Influent Of the Bank, Tel Aviv, Summer 2011
  • Oz Mualm, Influent Of the Bank, Tel Aviv, Summer 2011
  • Oz Mualm, Influent Of the Bank, Tel Aviv, Summer 2011
Eyal Vexler, Dance In the Street, Tel Aviv, Summer 2011
Eyal Vexler, Dance In the Street, Tel Aviv, Summer 2011

Press:

“… the sensitive and poetic contrast between the cold and military casing does exactly what art strive to do since time immemorial…” ErevRav, 28.08.2011, on Artists’ Protest

“… Public Movement, in a series of interventions in the public space during the weeks of civil awakening, interventions that were a part of the awakening but nevertheless a distinct presence within. The presence of the group’s members […] was of the type of events the add another component to the growing pool of visual civil language…” Ariela Azulay, Atalef, 14.09.2011

Oliver Marchart – Public Movement

“…The popular circle dance Od lo ahavti dai is from the 1970s and widely known in Israel. It is a group dance that evokes the strength and hope of building a Jewish state, and is taught to children early on in kindergarten. The intervention blocks traffic for the duration of the dance, which is two and a half minutes. The occupation of the crossing re-appropriates a familiar choreography and enacts a bodily knowledge of the dance that is specific to Israel. Although the onlookers might be surprised that the action is taking place there, the dance is nonetheless familiar to them, and because they know it by heart, they could even join in if they felt like it.”