Debriefing Session II

Public Movement invites visitors to attend a one-on-one meeting in which the group’s Agent delivers an account of its research about modern art made in Palestine before 1948. The private session draws out the performative relationship between nation-states and their cultural institutions.
The performance Debriefing Session II premiers in the United States as part of But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa. A limited number of individual sessions with a Public Movement Agent will take place in a secret location within the museum on Saturdays throughout the exhibition.

Debriefing Session II was created by Alhena Katsof and Dana Yahalomi during residencies at Artport Tel Aviv and was presented as part of the exhibition National Collection at Tel Aviv Museum of Art in 2015.

First activation: July 2015
Location: Artport, Tel Aviv. As part of Non Finito, Artport’s third year residency exhibition.

Performed in:
June - October 2016:
Guggenheim Museum, New York
As part of the exhibition But a Storm Is Blowing from Paradise: Contemporary Art of the Middle East and North Africa.
Curator: Sara Raza
Research and Training: Hagar Ophir, Public Movement Agent
Activating Public Movement Agents: Amir Farjoun, Ruth Patir


October - December 2015:
Tel Aviv Museum of Art. As part of Public Movement durational exhibition, National Collection.
Activating Public Movement Agents: Hagar Ophir, Nir Shaulof

October 2015:
Spielart Festival, Munich
Location: Villa Stuck Museum
Activating Public Movement Agent: Hagar Ophir

  • Public Movement, “Debriefing Session II” , Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation). Photo: Kristopher McKay Public Movement, “Debriefing Session II” , Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation). Photo: Kristopher McKay

The episode felt like it could have taken place in an espionage film or a government building just as easily as a museum. Indeed, the information conveyed during the session reinforced the tenuous connection between “truth” and “reality” as well as the firm one between the nation-state and museum.

Details of the conversation that followed have dissipated from my memory, but that both is and is beside the point. “Debriefing Session II” mines the divide between the ephemerality of information and the permanence of objects.
Hyperallergic / Risa Puleo